10.19.18

Director Luca Guadagnino Discusses "Suspiria"

In "Suspiria," directed by Luca Guadagnino, a darkness swirls at the center of a world-renowned dance company, one that will engulf the artistic director, an ambitious young dancer, and a grieving psychotherapist. Some will succumb to the nightmare. Others will finally wake up.

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>>> THANKS, EVERYBODY. THANK YOU VERY MUCH. WELCOME TO BUILD. ONE OF THE GREAT DIRECTORS WORKING TODAY REIMAGINED ONE OF THE GREATEST HORROR MOVIES OF ALL TIME GIVING IT A NEW LOOK AND APPROACH. LET'S TAKE A LOOK. \M\M \M\M \M\M \M\M \M\M \M\M

>> GOD DAMN I CAN'T WAIT TO SEE THAT AGAIN. LUCA GUADAGNINO, EVERYBODY.

>> HELLO.

>> I MEAN THAT. I SAW THAT IN THE THEATER TUESDAY NIGHT UPON LEAVING THE FIRST THING I THOUGHT WAS I CAN'T WAIT TO SEE THIS IN THE THEATER AGAIN.

>> THAT'S A GOOD THING.

>> IT'S A GREAT THING.

>> TWO TICKETS. PURCHASED ALREADY.

>> IT MEANS TWO THINGS, ONE, A MOVIE BUILT FOR THE THEATRICAL EXPERIENCE. YOU HAVE TO SIT WITH IT, WATCH IT IN THE DARK WITH OTHER PEOPLE AND GRAPPLE WITH WHAT YOU'RE DOING AS A FILMMAKER. THE SECOND THING IS THERE'S A LOT TO PICK UP ON. A LOT OF STUFF YOU WILL MISS FIRST GLANCE AT WATCHING THE MOVIE. IT REWARDS REPEAT VIEWINGS. SO EVERYONE ELSE BUY TICKETS FOR MULTIPLE OCCASIONS. WHAT I LOVE ABOUT WHAT YOU'VE DONE HERE, THE ORIGINAL "SUSPIRIA," I LOVE IT. IT TAKES PLACE IN BERLIN. IT WAS MADE IN 1977. IT'S KIND OF TIMELESS. IT COULD TAKE PLACE AT A BALLET ACADEMY ANYWHERE AND IN ALMOST ANY PERIOD OF TIME. YOU SAID, NO, LET'S MAKE "SUSPIRIA" ABOUT BERLIN IN 1977. SO WHEN DID YOU COME UP WITH THAT IDEA? WHAT MADE YOU WANT TO APPROACH THE MATERIAL FROM THAT ANGLE?

>> I THINK THAT THE FANTASTIC WRITER WHO WROTE THIS BEAUTIFUL SCRIPT IS MORE PRECISE THAN I. THE BASIS OF OUR CONVERSATIONS ABOUT ADAPTING THIS MOVIE, "SUSPIRIA," WERE GROUNDED ON BEING IN 1977 AND IN BERLIN. IN GERMANY. BECAUSE THE EXPERIENCE OF THE MOVIE BY DARIA, IT'S AN EXPERIENCE -- THE MOVIE CAN BE SET ANYWHERE. BUT IT'S THE CHILD OF ITS TIMES. IT'S A CHILD OF A PLACE AND TIME THAT WAS REALLY CONFLICTUAL, FILLED WITH ANGER AND VIOLENCE. SO WE THOUGHT MIRRORING THE STORY OF SUSIE BANNION AND MADAME BLANC, WITH THE TIMES AND THAT PLACE. AND I'M A SHOWMAN, THE IDEA OF MAKING TODAY A MOVIE SET IN THAT PERIOD OF TIME APPROACHES ALSO THE ELEMENTS OF THE PERIOD TO A DEEPER DEGREE OF ENTERTAINMENT.

>> I THINK THE ELEMENTS OF THE PERIOD, YOU HAVE A LOT OF FUN WITH IT. THERE ARE MOMENTS WHERE IT FEELS SPECIFIC AND EXTREMELY REALISTIC WITHIN THAT PERIOD. THERE ARE MOMENTS THEN WHERE IT FEELS LIKE THE SHOWMAN PLAYING WITH THAT PERIOD OF TIME. ONE THING THAT THE MOVIE TALKS ABOUT, THIS GROUP OF WITCHES. WE DON'T LEARN IT'S A COVENANT OF WITCHES UNTIL THE LAST ACT AND IT STARTS RAMPING UP AND THEY EXPLAIN THE MURDERS. WITH YOUR FILM, AS FAR AS WE KNOW, WE'RE IN A COVENANT OF WITCHES. SO WE'RE HAVING THIS CONVERSATION ABOUT THE PATRIARCHY AND ABOUT WOMEN AND A REVOLUTION -- OR AN ATTEMPTED REVOLUTION IS TAKING PLACE AROUND THEM TO OVERTHROW CAPITALISM, WHICH IS GAINING GROUND IN WEST BERLIN. WHERE DID YOU FIND THAT WITHIN THE ORIGINAL? DID YOU FIND THAT IN THE ORIGINAL? WAS IT JUST SOMETHING THAT ABOUT THAT PERIOD OF TIME YOU WANTED TO ADDRESS?

>> IN THE ORIGINAL I FOUND A CLASSIC FAIRYTALE OF GOOD AND EVENING. I GREW UP IN BELIEVING THAT NOT EVERYTHING IS GOOD AND -- THERE IS NOT GOOD AND EVIL. BUT THERE IS A CONTRADICTION IN EVERY ONE OF US. WITCHCRAFT COMES FROM SORT OF INDICTMENT. WITCHES WERE PERSECUTED AND KILLED, WOMEN. THEY WERE KILLED BECAUSE THEY WANTED TO BE TOGETHER AND THEY WANTED TO BE DOING THINGS THAT TRANSCENDED THE LAW OF THE CHURCH AND THE FATHERS. THEY HAD TO BE PERSECUTED AND INDICTED AS WITCHES. SO THE IDEA THAT IN DOING A MOVIE ABOUT WITCHES, WE TRIED TO BE IN POSITION OF THE WITCHES. IT WAS SOMETHING REALLY EXCITING TO DO.

>> FOR THE MOST PART THEY WERE AGAINST THE WITCHES.

>> EVIL VILLAIN.

>> YEAH.

>> SO YOU KIND OF COMING FROM THE PLACE OF A -- I GUESS I CAN'T ASK THAT QUESTION WITHOUT GIVING ANYTHING AWAY. I DON'T WANT TO GIVE ANYTHING AWAY. IT COMES OUT NEXT WEEK. BUY TWO TICKETS GO SEE IT. WHAT WAS THE TOUGHEST PART? THIS WAS A LONG PROCESS FOR YOU. YOU SPENT A NUMBER OF YEARS PUTTING THIS PROJECT TOGETHER?

>> IT'S A LABORIOUS PROJECT. I SAW THE MOVIE WHEN I WAS 14.

>> SORRY. WHAT DID YOU THINK WHEN YOU SAW THE MOVIE AT 14?

>> IT WAS A FORBIDDEN SCREENING. I CLOSED MYSELF IN MY BEDROOM. MY PARENTS WERE IN THE OTHER ROOM. I WAS WATCHING THIS MOVIE. THERE WAS A HEART STOPPED IN THE FIRST FIVE MINUTES. EVERYTHING ELSE WHO KNOWS THE MOVIE KNOWS. IT WAS VERY -- THE ELICITNESS OF IT, THE FREEDOM OF DARIA WERE EMPOWERING. WHAT WAS THE QUESTION?

>> THE QUESTION WAS YOU SAID IT WAS A LABORIOUS PROCESS.

>> YEAH, FROM THAT SCREENING I THOUGHT EVERY DIRECTOR IS A BIT OF A MEGLEOMANIAC. I WAS ALREADY AT 14. I THOUGHT ONE DAY I WILL DO MY OPEN VERSION OF "SUSPIRIA.” I SINCERELY HAD THIS AIM SINCE THEN. THEN IN 2007 WITH MY PRODUCING PARTNERS WE SEDUCED DARIA AND CLAIRE YO WE CONVINCED THEM TO GIVE US THE RIGHTS.

>> WHEN?

>> IN 2007. BEFORE THAT SOMEBODY ELSE --

>> DAVID GORDON GREEN.

>> NO NOT DAVID. IT WAS MIRAMAX. BUT THEN IN 2007 I WAS ALSO DOING "I AM LOVE.” I WASN'T REALLY READY. I HAD NOT MET DAVID, WHO I ALWAYS ADMIRED, DAVID GORDON GREEN. I WISH THE BEST FOR DAVID AND HIS "HALLOWEEN" WHICH OPENS TODAY. I'M SEEING IT AFTER HERE. I LOVE DAVID. I SAID TO HIM I HAVE THE RIGHTS TO THIS FILM. WOULD YOU BE INTERESTED IN DOING IT YOURSELF? HE SAID YES. BUT, YOU KNOW, CINEMA IS COMPLICATED. SOMETIMES YOU THINK THINGS WILL HAPPEN LIKE THIS, THEY DON'T. MANY YEARS LATER MY PASSION FOR IT WAS AGAIN MOTIVATING ME TO GO BACK TO IT HERE WE ARE WHAT DO YOU THINK IT WAS THAT MOTIVATED YOU GO BACK TO IT?

>> WELL, THIS BLOOD, THIS FOUNTAIN OF BLOOD.

>> THE FOUNTAIN OF BLOOD.

>> I LIKE A REAL BIG STATEMENT.

>> YEAH. YOU DEFINITELY HAVE ONE WITH THIS FILM. YEAH. WAS THERE SOMETHING ABOUT THE WAKE OF THE SUCCESS OF "CALL ME BY YOUR NAME" YOU COULD GET THE ATTENTION AND MAYBE THE FINANCES YOU WANTED TO MAKE THIS AS MUCH AS A MAXIMALIST MOVIE YOU WANTED?

>> NO. NO. I WAS DOING "SUSPIRIA" AND "CALL ME BY YOUR NAME" CAME. I WAS ALREADY PREPPING THIS MOVIE. WE WERE ALREADY WORKING WITH AMAZON IN DOING THIS FILM WHEN "CALL ME" BECAME SOMETHING FOR ME TO DO BECAUSE WE HAD TO DO IT. THE ONLY WAY THE MOVIE COULD DO IT IS TINY BUDGET AND ME DIRECTING IT I DECIDED TO DO "CALL ME BY YOUR NAME" WHILE PREPPING FOR "SUSPIRIA.” WE SHOT THAT IN 2016. AND THE PREPARATION OF THIS WAS GOING ON. WE SHOT THIS IN OCTOBER OF THE SAME YEAR.

>> WOW.

>> I DID WORK ON "SUSPIRIA” EVERY DAY OF MY LIFE THROUGHOUT THE ENTIRE YEAR WE PROMOTED "CALL ME" IN AMERICA.

>> I WANT TO GO BACK TO THAT MOMENT WHEN YOU SAID YOU WERE 14 AND YOU WANTED TO MAKE MY "SUSPIRIA.” THAT'S NOT ABOUT REMAKING OR REIMAGINING THE MOVIE, BUT IT'S ABOUT MAKING A MOVIE THAT HAS AN IMPACT ON YOU THE WAY IT DID.

>> EVERY PERSON WHO SEES A FILM IN A WAY PROJECTS HIMSELF OR HERSELF IN THE FILM. AND THE MOVIE THAT YOU SEE IS NOT GOING TO BE THE SAME MOVIE THAT YOU WILL SEE. IT'S A SUBJECTIVE EXPERIENCE. THAT'S WHAT CINEMA DOES.

>> ARE THERE OTHER MOVIES THAT YOU HAVE THAT FEELING ABOUT THAT YOU WANT TO MAKE YOUR VERSION OF THAT OR HAVE THAT IMPACT?

>> NO, BECAUSE OTHERWISE I WOULD BE A STALKER OF GREAT FILMS. NO. NO. THAT'S THE ONLY ONE.

>> ARE YOU NOT LIKE A STALKER OF GREAT FILMS?

>> YES, BUT I THINK IT'S ENOUGH. THAT'S IT.

>> WHAT WAS THE -- WHAT WAS THE HARDEST PART ABOUT MAKING "SUSPIRIA"?

>> WELL, MANY THINGS THAT ARE REALLY OFF THE CENTER OF MAKING IT. IT WAS LABORIOUS TO PUT TOGETHER THE PROCESS OF FINANCING IT. AMAZON AND K. PERIOD MEDIA WHO FULLY FINANCED "MANCHESTER BY THE SEA" THEY CO-FINANCED THE MOVIE WITH US. IT IS MADE UNDER ITALIAN LAW. SO IT'S AN ITALIAN FILM. WE HAD GO THROUGH THAT STUFF. IT'S INTERESTING HOW TO GO THROUGH THE COMPLEXITY OF THE PERIOD, THE SPECIAL EFFECTS, THE DANCE, ALL THAT WAS REALLY LOVELY WALK IN THE PARK.

>> THAT'S THE BEST PART OF THE PROCESS, THE FILMMAKING, RIGHT?

>> EVERY TIME THERE WAS A NEW BANK OF BLOOD TO BE TRIED, I WAS HAPPY. MORE. MORE.

>> DID YOU EVER IMAGINE YOURSELF AS A HORRY MOVIE FILMMAKER?

>> WHO KNOWS ME VERY WELL KNOWS I CAME TO MAKE A HORROR MOVIE TOO LATE. I ALWAYS WANTED TO MAKE HORROR FILMS. I'M A BIG SCHOLAR OF HORROR FILMS.

>> REALLY?

>> I WANTED TO BE A HORROR MOVIE DIRECTOR.

>> WHAT DID IT FEEL LIKE WHEN YOU BECAME KIND OF A HOUSEHOLD NAME AS A DIRECTOR BECAUSE OF A MOVIE LIKE "CALL ME BY HER NAME” WHICH IS BY NO MEANS A HORROR MOVIE.

>> IT'S STRANGE. I DON'T THINK THIS WILL BE MY ONLY HORROR FILM.

>> CAN WE TALK ABOUT HOW IT'S A DIFFERENT KIND OF HORROR FILM. WHEN WE SAY THE WORDS HORROR, WE'RE USING THAT WORD LOOSELY ABOUT THIS FILM. THERE'S SO MUCH MORE TO THIS THAN THE STALK, KILL, RUN AWAY, STALK, KILL, RUN AWAY ASPECT OF IT.

>> AND IN "THE EXORCIST" IT TAKES TWO HOURS AND 15 MINUTES TO GET TO THE POINT. IT'S A SUPER SLOW BURN. AT THE BEGINNING IT'S ALMOST LIKE A FAMILY DRAMA. A DAUGHTER WHO IS SICK, THE MOTHER DOESN'T KNOW WHAT'S GOING ON. SHE KEEPS GOING TO DOCTORS AFTER DOCTORS. IN THE CURRENT INDUSTRY PROBABLY THAT WOULD HAVE NEVER HAPPENED BECAUSE THERE IS NO IMMEDIACY TO THE WAY IN WHICH THE AUDIENCE PERCEIVES THAT. BUT THE FACT THAT STILL TODAY "THE EXORCIST" IS A MOVIE THAT'S SO IMPACTFUL TO ANYBODY WHO SEES IT TELLS YOU --

>> OR "THE SHINING.”

>> OR "THE SHINING.”

>> I FELT THIS WAS -- NOT IN LINE WITH THE SHINING BUT SIMILAR TO THE SHINING. SOMETIMES WHAT IS HORRIFYING IS WHAT IS OBTUSE, UNREACHABLE AND THAT WE DON'T UNDERSTAND. SO MUCH ABOUT THIS MOVIE IS ABOUT WHAT YOU DON'T UNDERSTAND AND ABOUT EVERYTHING BETWEEN THE LINES. WHICH CAN BE DIFFICULT FOR SOME AUDIENCES BUT REWARDING FOR AN AUDIENCE LIKE THIS.

>> I THINK AUDIENCE ARE MUCH MORE INTELLIGENT THAN MARKETING DEPARTMENTS.

>> MARKETING DEPARTMENTS WOULD DISAGREE. CAN YOU TALK ABOUT IN THE TRAILER WE SEE A DANCER BEING TOSSED AROUND A LITTLE BIT.

>> THE WONDERFUL FOKINA. SHE IS A RUSSIAN DANCER WHO WORKS IN STOCKHOLM, THIS IS HER FIRST ACTING ROLE. EVERYTHING IN THE SEQUENCE -- WHO ELSE IN THE AUDIENCE HAS SEEN "SUSPIRIA"? ANYBODY? ANY WAY, YOU'LL SEE WHAT HAPPENS TO HER. IT'S WHAT SHE MADE US BELIEVE HAPPENED TO HER. THERE'S NO WIRES, NO NOTHING. NO CGI.

>> HOW LONG DID YOU SHOOT HER LIKE THAT?

>> I THINK THREE DAYS. YOU SHOT HER DOING THAT FOR THREE DAYS?

>> YEAH.

>> THAT'S AMAZING. I HAVE NO QUESTION OTHER THAN THAT'S REALLY COOL.

>> WE HAD TWO DAYS WITH DAKOTA IN THE OTHER ROOM.

>> THE JUXTAPOSING. YOU WORKED WITH DAKOTA IN A BIGGER SPLASH BEFORE THAT. WHAT MADE YOU WANT TO WORK WITH HER ON THIS FILM?

>> SHE'S SHARP. SHE HAS THE CAPACITY OF BEING BOLD AS AN ACTRESS. SHE'S NOT PRETTY, SHE'S TOUGH WHEN SHE ACTS. I LIKE THAT ABOUT HER VERY MUCH.

>> TILDA YOU WORKED WITH ON ALMOST EVERY MOVIE OF YOUR JEER.

>> ALMOST.

>> WITH THE EXCEPTION OF ONE OR TWO?

>> NO, MORE.

>> OKAY.

>> I THINK WE WORKED ON FOUR.

>> IN THIS SHE PLAYS THREE CHARACTERS. RIGHT?

>> YEAH. A NEW REVELATION.

>> NOT NOW.

>> WHERE DID THAT IDEA COME FROM? DID YOU PROPOSE THAT TO HER? IS THAT SOMETHING SHE WANTED TO DO?

>> NO. I THINK IT'S ONCE WE GOT THE SCRIPT BY DAVID, IT -- I HAD INSTINCT BASICALLY. I KNEW MY INSTINCTS WERE GOING TO BE MET BY HER INSTINCT. FIRST OF ALL, BECAUSE OF THE FUN OF IT. AND ALSO BECAUSE THIS IS A MOVIE IN WHICH YOU HAVE A PSYCHOANALYST INVESTIGATING WHAT'S GOING ON, AND NOT BELIEVING IN THE RATIONAL THAT PEOPLE TALK ABOUT TO HIM. BECAUSE IT'S INVESTED IN THE PSYCHE --

>> NOT BELIEVING WOMEN.

>> SPECIFICALLY NOT BELIEVING WOMEN. BECAUSE IT'S INVESTED IN THE PSYCHE, THIS MOVIE IN A WAY IS TRYING TO GO INTO THE WORLD OF THE WAY IN WHICH FREUD TALKED ABOUT THE PSYCHE OF PEOPLE. YOU HAVE THE ID, THE IG, AND THE SUPER EGO. WITH TILDA, SHE WOULD PLAY THE THREE ASPECTS OF OUR PSYCHE.

>> WOW.

>> LET ALONE THE FACT THAT THE IDEA OF THE CRAFT OF DOING THAT WAS VERY AMUSING TO ME.

>> SO MUCH OF YOUR INSTINCTUAL IDEAS, ARE THEY BASED AROUND THE FUN YOU'LL HAVE DOING THAT ON SET?

>> LIFE IS TOO SHORT. AT LEAST HAVE SOME FUN.

>> HOW DID SHE HANDLE IT?

>> FANTASTICALLY WELL.

>> YOU SAID SHE'S NOT THE ONLY ONE, RIGHT?

>> WE HAVE MORE PEOPLE THAT DO DUAL ROLES IN THIS MOVIE.

>> YOU WORKED WITH DAVID IN THIS MOVIE?

>> DAVID KAJGANICH.

>> IS THIS A THING WHERE YOU WORKED WITH HIM ON "A BIGGER SPLASH" AND THEN YOU BROUGHT HIM ON TO "SUSPIRIA"?

>> I FOUND SOMEBODY WHO I TRUSTED IN MY PERM LIFE BUT ALSO IN HIS CAPACITY OF UNDERSTANDING STORIES, CHARACTERS, TEXTURE, TONE. HE'S A GREAT WRITER. IT'S A RARITY. SO I HELD HIM TIGHT, CLOSE TO ME.

>> ARE YOU CLOSE PERSONAL FRIENDS WITH HIM?

>> YEAH. I TEND TO MAKE STRONG CONNECTIONS WITH THE PEOPLE I WORK WITH.

>> YOU MAINTAIN BASICALLY THE PEOPLE YOU WORK WITH ARE THE SAME PEOPLE YOU HAVE THOSE CONNECTIONS TO?

>> I HAVE THE SAME EDITOR, PROBABLY MY BEST FRIEND FOR 26 YEARS. WE DID EVERYTHING TOGETHER.

>> THAT MEANS YOU CAN HANDLE THE DISAGREEMENTS VERY WELL.

>> WE'RE PAST THAT. WE'RE LIKE A GRUMPY OLD COUPLE. WHEN SOMEONE COMES N WE'RE UNITED. PARTICULARLY PRODUCERS AND WHEN THEY COME IN. WE GOT AWAY WITH MURDER 152 MINUTES.

>> THIS MOVIE?

>> YEAH. OH, YEAH. YOU GOT AWAY WITH MURDER ON THIS ONE. THAT'S ONE THING THAT IS AN ABSOLUTE THRILL ABOUT WATCHING THIS. IT'S A RARITY THAT YOU GET TO SEE A FILMMAKER FEEL UNENCUMBERED BY THE MARKET OR BY ANYTHING ELSE OTHER THAN THEIR OWN IDEAS AND VISION. THAT'S SOMETHING THAT IS KIND OF BREATH TAKING TO BEHOLD WHEN IT COMES TO THIS MOVIE. YOU'RE THE TYPE OF FILMMAKER WHO IT FEELS LIKE THE PROCESS IS FLUID, WHETHER IT'S THE SCRIPT TO WHY YOU'RE SHOOTING, WHY YOU'RE EDITING, NOTHING FEELS LIKE IT'S A STATIC THING. I'M WATCHING A FILM AND THEN AN EDITED SCRIPT KIND OF THING. DO YOU FIND A LOT ON SET WHILE WORKING? ARE YOU ESSENTIALLY GOING OFF OF THE SCRIPT?

>> WELL, I THINK IT'S A CONSTANT PROCESS. YOU KNOW, LIKE YOU WRITE THE SCRIPT, YOU WORK ON THIS SCRIPT PREPARING YOUR WORK, THEN YOU REWRITE IN A WAY ON SET WITH YOUR ACTORS, AND THEN YOU GO IN THE EDITING ROOM. AND IT'S COMPLETELY NEW PROCESS OF WRITING THAT STARTS AGAIN. SO I THINK, YEAH, IT'S A VERY FLUID CONSTANT PROCESS HOPEFULLY TO PERFECTION. TO PERFECT WHAT YOU TRY TO DO.

>> I THINK OF THE INCREDIBLE DANCE SEQUENCE IN THE FILM THAT WE SEE A LITTLE BIT OF.

>> THE RED ROBES?

>> YEAH. IT'S GREAT. WHAT IS WONDERFUL ABOUT THAT SEQUENCE TO ME, WHILE IT FEELS INCREDIBLY CHOREOGRAPHED, VISUALLY AND ON SET, IT ALSO FEELS LOOSE IN A WAY. IT FEELS YOU ARE CAPTURING SOMETHING THAT HAPPENS IN THE MOMENT AND SPONTANEOUS. IT HAS A FEEL OF A VISIONARY CHOREOGRAPHY MIXED WITH A KIND OF DOCUMENTARY SENSE AS WELL.

>> THANK YOU. THIS IS PROBABLY THE BIGGEST COMPLIMENT I EVER GOT FROM SOMEBODY. IT'S EXACTLY WHAT I'M GRASPING FOR IN WHAT I DO. AND AND IT'S SO DIFFICULT. I DON'T KNOW IF I ACHIEVED THAT. THANK YOU. I'M FLATTERED. THE TRUTH IS THAT WHEN YOU DO A MOVIE YOU HAVE TO TRY NOT TO THINK OF EVERY PART OF WHAT YOU'RE PUTTING TOGETHER IN ORDER TO FILM AS ONLY AT THE SERVICE OF THE FILM. YOU KNOW, LIKE IF YOU DO A MOVIE ABOUT A COMPANY OF DANCERS WHO ARE DANCING IN 1977, YOU HAVE TO TRY TO REALLY MAKE THAT COME TRUE. SO WHEN YOU FILM IT, YOU ARE OBSERVING IT. YOU ARE NOT RECORDING SOMETHING THAT HAS BEEN MADE FOR YOU. THAT'S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE MUSIC VIDEO AND CINEMA IN MY OPINION. SO IN THIS CASE, FOR INSTANCE, WE TRIED TO MAKE SURE THAT THE HELENA MARKOS AT THE BASE OF THE STORY WAS ALMOST LIKE A COMPANY OF DANCER EXISTED IN REALITY. ALL THE DANCERS EXCEPT DAKOTA ARE REAL DANCERS. THE CHOREOGRAPHY EXISTS IN ITSELF.

>> WHEN IT COMES TO CAPTURING THAT, YOU'RE NOT THINKING ABOUT SWEEPING OPERATIC CAMERA MOVES, YOU'RE THINKING ABOUT CAPTURING THAT IN THE MOMENT.

>> ABSOLUTELY. I USE MY -- I DID A MOVIE CALLED "MELISSA P.” I SAID I NEED A DOLLY THAT GOES UP, UP, UP, AND THEY GAVE ME THE DOLLY. IT DOESN'T MEAN ANYTHING. IT'S JUST RHETORICAL. I THINK A MOVIE SHOULD BE VIBRANT.

>> I THINK YOU CAN SEE THAT IN SOMETHING LIKE "CALL ME ABOUT YOUR NAME" LIKE WHEN RAY FEIN IS DANCING ON THE DECK OF THE POOL, THE SUN IS THERE. IT'S A BEAUTIFUL SWEEPING SHOT. THE WAY IT'S CAPTURED --

>> IT'S JUST A PAN.

>> THERE'S SOMETHING ABOUT IT THAT FEELS LIKE YOU'RE CAPTURING A MOMENT RATHER THAN YOU'RE CREATING -- EVEN THOUGH IT BECOMES QUITE VISUAL AND SPECTACLISH, IT DOESN'T FEEL LIKE A DIRECTOR SLAMMING YOUR HEAD INTO THE IDEA OF THE SPECTACLE. THE SAME THING WITH "CALL ME BY YOUR NAME.” IT'S SO BEAUTIFUL. THIS INCREDIBLE ITALIAN LANDSCAPE. AT THE SAME TIME YOU FEEL COMMITTED TO THE CHARACTERS AND WHAT THEY'RE SAYING. CAPTURING WHAT THEY DO. LIKE THE LITTLE DANCE THROUGHOUT THE MOVIES. I THINK OTHER DIRECTORS WOULD NOT BE IN TUNE WITH THAT, THEY WOULD BE IN TUNE WITH THE SWEEPING LANDSCAPE OF IT. NOT A QUESTION, JUST A COMPLIMENT.

>> THANK YOU.

>> WHO WANTS TO ASK AN ACTUAL QUESTION.

>> I WROTE THIS ONE DOWN SO I WOULD HAVE IT READY AND PHRASED RIGHT. I REMEMBER READING THAT YOU SAID THIS FILM WAS NOT A REIMAGINING BUT A REINVOKING OF THE EMOTION YOU FELT THE FIRST TIME YOU SAW THE ORIGINAL. CAN YOU TALK ABOUT WHAT THAT FEELING WAS, HOW IT DIFFERS IN DIRECTION AS OPPOSED TO "CALL ME BY YOUR NAME" WHICH ENDS WITH A DIFFERENT EMOTION THAN THIS ONE IS GOING FOR.

>> WHEN I SAW THE MOVIE, I KIND OF FELT THE FREEDOM OF DARIO ARGENTO THAT EMPOWERED ME. I WASN'T SCARED. I WAS EXCITED ABOUT THE DECISIONS HE MADE. THE POSSIBILITY THAT A CINEMA COULD BE AN ASSAULT TO THE SENSES. THERE WAS SOME INDIVIDUAL VOICE LIKE THAT THAT COULD SPEAK THROUGH A MOVIE. THAT WAS SOMETHING THAT FREED ME VERY MUCH. I WAS TALKING TO A FRIEND BEFORE COMING HERE, IT'S TRUE WITH EVERYTHING I DO, ANYTHING THAT HAS TO DEAL WITH CREATIVITY IN A WAY, IT HAS TO DO WITH SORT OF BAG OF MEMORIES, BAG OF EMOTIONS THAT YOU HAVE GONE THROUGH, THAT YOU CAN TRY TO RELIVE AGAIN. "CALL ME BY YOUR NAME" IT BELONGS POSSIBLY TO THE MEMORY OF SOME SUMMERS THAT I THINK MANY OF US MAY HAVE HAD. IF NOT IN THE COUNTRYSIDE.

>> I THINK WHAT YOU'RE DESCRIBING WHEN IT COMES TO YOUR EXPERIENCE WATCHING THIS AS A 14-YEAR-OLD IS NOT BEING SCARED, NOT HAVING SEEN A HORROR MOVIE, BUT WHAT HAPPENS TO FILM LOVERS IS AROUND THE AGE OF 13, 14, YOU SEE A MOVIE THAT TELLS YOU A DIRECTOR IT BEHIND THIS.

>> I'M A FETISH OF DIRECTORS. MY PARTNER IS A DIRECTOR. I ONLY DATED DIRECTORS IN MY LIFE. I'M SERIOUS. NEVER AN ACTOR. NO.

>> VERY EMOTIONAL.

>> NO. NO. NO.

>> DIRECTORS ARE SENSITIVE?

>> BUT I LIKE THAT SENSITIVITY. I DON'T LIKE THAT NEEDINESS.

>> THAT'S FAIR. THAT'S A GOOD DESCRIPTION.

>> BUT I LOVE ACTORS AS A FRIEND, AND AS THE DIRECTOR. YEAH. THE PERSONALITY OF A DIRECTOR IS SO EXCITING. YEAH.

>> I REMEMBER WHEN I WAS 14 SEEING "BOOGIE NIGHTS" AND THE OPENING SHOT AND THE CAMERA COMING UPSIDE DOWN, GOING DOWN THE SIDEWALK INTO THE CLUB AND GOING WHAT IS THIS? OH, IT'S FROM THE DIRECTOR OF "GOODFELLAS," THEN I SHOULD WATCH -- IT HAPPENS, AND YOU BECOME AN OBSESSED PERSON WHO LIVES IN THE DARK.

>>> THINK THE STUDIO SHOULD DIRECTOR. IT'S A DIRECTOR MEDIUM CINEMA.

>> NEXT QUESTION?

>> HI, LUCA. THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR MAKING SUCH BEAUTIFUL AND EXCLUSIVE FILMS. YOU HAVE SUCH GREAT TASTES OF MUSIC. I WANTED TO ASK WHAT YOUR VISION OF THE MUSIC FOR THIS FILM IS, AND HOW DID YOU DECIDE ON COOPERATING WITH THE MUSIC?

>> THANK YOU. I THINK MY TASTE FOR MUSIC IS SOMETHING I SHARE WITH MY EDITOR. HE MADE ME DISCOVER SO MUCH GREAT MUSIC THROUGHOUT OUR FRIENDSHIP AND COLLABORATION. THE -- WHEN I STARTED MAKING "SUSPIRIA," I HAD MANY THOUGHTS ABOUT THE MUSIC. USUALLY I DON'T WORK WITH A COMPOSER. I COLLECT MUSIC I LIKE AND I PUT IT ON SCREEN. BUT STRANGELY I FELT LIKE FOR "SUSPIRIA" THAT SHOULDN'T HAVE BEEN THE CASE. PROBABLY BECAUSE EVERYTHING I WAS THINKING ABOUT WERE ALWAYS GOING BACK TO STANLEY KUBRICK. I WAS SAYING NOW WE CAN USE THIS. DONE. NOW WE CAN USE THIS.

>> WHY DO YOU THINK IT WAS ALWAYS GOING BACK TO STANLEY KUBRICK?

>> BECAUSE I THINK KUBRICK IN THE WAY HE USES MUSIC IS UNPARALLELED.

>> YEAH.

>> DESPITE THE FACT HE ALMOST NEVER USED PRE-EXISTING COMPOSITIONS. AND YET THE MUSIC OF HIS MOVIES ARE REALLY A VOCATIONAL OF HIM. IT IS VERY TELLING.

>> MM-HMM. THIS IS A MOVIE THAT REFLECTS AND REVOLVES AROUND THE CONCEPT OF THE UNCANNY. I THINK STANLEY KUBRICK HAD PUT THE WORLD END ON THE USE OF CLASSICAL MUSIC AND THE UNCANNY WITH "THE SHINING.”

>> IS "THE SHINING" NOT LEGETI?

>> IT WAS LEGETI. IT'S DONE. SO I FELT LIKE WE HAD TO FIND SOMETHING THAT WAS TRULY CONNECTED WITH WHO WE ARE. AS PEOPLE INTERNATIONALLY SPEAKING. I'M 47. I STARTED TO FANTASIZE THAT THE MUSICAL VOICE OF MY GENERATION IS THOM YORKE, WHO I DIDN'T KNOW. I JUST ADMIRED HIM. HE'S A EVOCATIVE, SORROWFUL, MELANCHOLIC MUSIC WOULD BE GOOD FOR THIS. I APPROACHED HIM. I APPROACHED HIM, AND HE SAID OKAY, LET'S FINALLY MEET. AND HERE WE ARE.

>> DID HE SEE ANY OF YOUR FILMS LIKE "CALL ME BY YOUR NAME?”

>> NO, NO. IT WASN'T MADE PRIOR TO THAT.

>> SO YOU MET WITH HIM FAR PRIOR TO "SUSPIRIA" BEING SHOT?

>> YEAH.

>> WE MET TWO YEARS BEFORE. THEN WE AGREED ON DOING IT LIKE SEVEN MONTHS BEFORE DOING THE FILM. IN SEPTEMBER HE STARTED SENDING US MATERIAL. BEAUTIFUL MATERIAL. THE SONG "SUSPIRIA," THAT'S BEEN DONE BEFORE WE SHOT.

>> SO YOU HAD IT ON SET TO LISTEN TO.

>> YES.

>> WHILE YOU WERE DOING THE SEQUENCE?

>> YEAH.

>> NEXT QUESTION.

>> I READ JUST A FEW HOURS AGO YOUR NEXT PROJECT WILL BE YOUR SECOND FILM ABOUT MUSICIANS AFTER "BIGGER SPLASH.” WHAT DREW YOU TO MAKING A SECOND PROJECT ABOUT MUSICIANS? WHAT CAN YOU TELL US IN GENERAL ABOUT IT?

>> I MADE A MOVIE IN 2002 CALLED MUNDO CIVILIZADO. IT FOLLOWS FOUR YOUNG KIDS IN SICILY. AT THE TIME IT WAS VERY IMPORTANT MUSICAL SCENE. THESE FOUR WONDERS, THEY MEET MUSICIANS OF EVERY KIND. SO I'M DRAWN BY MUSIC VERY MUCH. IT IS SOMETHING I'M NOT GOOD AT. I CAN'T DO MUSIC. I CAN'T SING. I'M VERY OUT OF TUNE. YET IT'S A SOURCE OF GREAT INSPIRATION FOR ME. IN THE CASE OF "BLOOD ON THE TRACKS" WHAT HAPPENS IS ONE OF OUR PRODUCERS IN "CALL ME BY YOUR NAME" WHILE WE WERE FILMING OR EDITING "CALL ME" MENTIONED HE HAD ACQUIRED THE RIGHTS TO MAKE A MOVIE FROM THE ALBUM BY BOB DILLON, WHICH I FOUND A VERY BEAUTIFUL IDEA. VERY SMART. IT'S NOT A SURPRISE WHEN I SAY THAT FOR ME ANYTHING CAN BE A MOVIE. EVEN THE CARPET. THE ORIGINAL STORY DOESN'T MEAN ANYTHING. IT'S THE POINT OF VIEW OF WHO DOES WHAT. THE IDEA THAT YOU COULD DO A MOVIE FROM "BLOOD IN THE TRACKS” THIS SORROWFUL, INTIMATE ALBUM THAT IS IN THE CANON OF 20th CENTURY MUSIC WAS FASCINATING. IT WAS A CHANCE, AS THEY SAY. I COULDN'T SAY NO.

>> WE'RE TALKING ABOUT UPCOMING MOVIES OF YOURS, I FEEL LIKE THIS SEQUEL TO "CALL ME BY YOUR NAME" IS BROUGHT UP QUITE OFTEN. HOW REAL OF A THING IS THAT? HOW MUCH OF IT JUST FUN TO SAY TO PEOPLE?

>> NO, NO, NO. FUN TO SAY NEVER. WHEN I SAY SOMETHING, I MEAN IT. IF SOMEONE DIES AND WE CAN'T FILM THEM, WE WON'T BE DOING IT. BUT NO.

>> IS THERE A SCRIPT BEING WORKED ON?

>> I'M ENGAGING IN CONVERSATIONS WITH ANDREA. FIRST OF ALL IN THE BOOK "CALL ME BY YOUR NAME" WE NEGLECTED A BIG CHUNK OF IT. I THINK 50 PAGES. AFTER THEY SEPARATE, THE NOVEL KEEPS GOING FOR 20 YEARS. THAT'S ASTONISHING THAT WHOEVER IS SURPRISED OR CRITICAL ABOUT IT DOESN'T KNOW THAT -- OR DOESN'T UNDERSTAND THAT THE NOVEL BY ACIMAN GOES ON FOR 20 YEARS. IN THE DNA OF THIS STORY IT IS THE FACT THAT ELIO AND OLIVER ARE NOT JUST THE YOUNG ELIO AND OLIVER. THERE'S THE INTENTION OF SEEING AND FOLLOWING THEM GROWING UP. THAT'S THE FIRST THING. THE SECOND THING BEING BECAUSE TO DO THE MOVIE WAS A GREAT EXPERIENCE, TO SEE THESE PEOPLE COMING ALIVE ON SCREEN THROUGH THE WONDERFUL GENEROSITY OF THE ACTORS PLAYING THESE PEOPLE, AND BASICALLY DICTATING MY LIFE THROUGH THE PRISM OF PLEASURE BECAUSE I DON'T SEE WHY NOT, I WANT TO SEE AGAIN THESE CHARACTERS. I WANT TO SPEND TIME WITH THE ACTORS PLAYING THESE CHARACTERS. I THINK THAT BECAUSE OF THE BEAUTIFUL ETHICAL FORCE THAT EVERY ONE OF THESE PEOPLE EXPRESSES. I THINK IT'S BEAUTIFUL TO SEE HOW THESE PEOPLE GROW UP. BETTER VERSION OF US. LET'S SEE THEM.

>> DID YOU JUST USE THE PHRASE DICTATING MY LIFE THROUGH THE PRISM OF PLEASURE?

>> YES.

>> I WILL USE THAT NOW ALL THE TIME. TIME FOR ONE MORE QUESTION. RIGHT HERE.

>> I'M A FILMMAKER FROM AMSTERDAM. I WAS IN THE CLASSROOM WAY BACK WITH THE DAUGHTER OF GENAE. I WAS SUPER SURPRISED YOU CAST HER.

>> I'M A BIG FAN.

>> MY QUESTION IS -- WHEN I SAW THE FORT MAN, SHE'S ON TOP OF THE GUY, THEY MAKE LOVE, HE -- SHE -- HE SAYS TO HER, I DON'T KNOW IF YOU'RE A WOMAN, SHE MOVES AND SAYS NOW WHAT DO YOU THINK ABOUT ME. I MEAN, THAT -- FIRST OF ALL, PAUL VAN HOVEN, SHE'S AN AMAZING ACTRESS.

>> WHICH FILM IS THAT?

>> FORT MAN. SHE IS AN ICON TO ME. YOU HAVE TO COMPLETE YOUR QUESTION MAYBE.

>> YOU ANSWERED HALF OF IT.

>> LET ME FINISH THE FIRST HALF.

>> IT'S THE SAME TOPIC, SO YOU CAN GIVE A BIG ANSWER. ALSO A FORMER LEGEND, LIKE ALL THE WITCHES ARE LEGENDS FROM THAT PERIOD. AL I'M SURPRISED. I'M LOOKING FORWARD TO WATCHING THE WITCHES AS WELL.

>> WELL, RENEE I'M A MASSIVE FAN. I WAS SCARED SHE WOULD SAY NO. SHE SAID YES. AND THEN WE HIRED -- WE CAST ANGELA WINKLER AND INGRID CAVEN, WHO BY THE WAY WAS THE WIFE OF BINDER.

>> DID YOU JUST PULL HER ASIDE FOR STORIES ALL DAY.

>> SHE PULLED ME ASIDE FOR STORIES. SHE'S FANTASTIC. YOU SHOULD SEE AT THE END, WATCH OUT FOR INGRID. WILD. AND ME AND MY CASTING DIRECTOR, STELLA SALVINO, WE SAID WE WOULD HAVE A GREAT CAST OF WITCHES. THERE IS A PIECE OF MUSIC FOR HER TO SING. I WOULD SAY HAIL TO THE WITCHES. WE LOVE THEM.

>> LUCA, I LOVED HAVING YOU HERE. IT'S FUN TALKING TO A PERSON WHO LOVES MOVIES AS MUCH AS YOU DO "SUSPIRIA" IS INCREDIBLE. IT'S A DREAM. IT'S TOTAL MADNESS OUT OF THE BRAIN OF THIS GUY RIGHT HERE. HE LIVES HIS LIFE THROUGH THE PRISM OF PLEASURE. IT OPENS IN THEATERS NEXT WEEK ON FRIDAY. GIVE LUCA A ROUND OF APPLAUSE.

>> THANK YOU. [ APPLAUSE ]

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Allison Williams

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Paris Hilton

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It's not every day that we have actors of such magnitude like Amy Adams and Steve Carell! You cannot miss our conversation with the stars of the Golden Globe-nominated film, "Vice."

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Cody Simpson

Cody Simpson has made his Broadway debut on the amazing "Anastasia," and we couldn't be happier! Find out what the actor/singer has been enjoying most about the musical. (Photo Credit: Noam Galai /BUILD )

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She sure can take a photo! 😍 We were ecstatic to talk to the lovely Hailee Steinfeld about her role in the new Transformers film, "Bumblebee," and more! (Photo Credit: Noam Galai /BUILD )

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